Get to Know Your PT: Aaron Page, Therapydia Denver Physical Therapist

Therapydia Denver physical therapist Aaron Page takes some time to talk smoothies, his recent move to Colorado, and what he wishes everyone knew about PT.

“The best workout plan is something that’s sustainable. In order to create lasting change, it needs to be approachable and repeatable.”

When did you know that you wanted to be a physical therapist?

Like a lot of physical therapists I know, I was an athlete growing up and had my fair share of injuries, so I was exposed to PT early and often. I got to know a great PT in my area when I was 15 or so, and he was a clear example of someone who cared about his patients and I wanted to be a practitioner like that. I guess I officially knew in undergrad when I decided to switch my major from Biology to Health and Human Sciences and move forward to grad school with being a PT as my goal.

What is the biggest challenge involved in being a PT?

The biggest challenge for a PT (besides the paperwork) is not falling into specific patterns of treatment. It’s easy to start going down similar paths of rehab with patients that may be exhibiting similar characteristics. The important thing to keep reminding yourself that each patient is unique and small nuances in care can make a big difference, so you need to be constantly reflecting on your choices and adapting to new information.

How do you like to stay active?

I recently moved to Colorado so anything I can do outdoors like hiking or biking has been great. I’m a fan of resistance training too and try to incorporate that into my treatment sessions, so I’m training in the gym as well to make sure I don’t ask my patients to do anything I can’t do.

What’s your favorite song to get you motivated?

It’s kind of obscure, but my go-to song for motivation is “Quiet Little Voices” by We Were Promised Jetpacks. I like songs that build throughout and this one does that really well. It’s super helpful on a run when the tempo picks up and the band gets louder as you go on.

What surprised you the most about the physical therapist profession?

Realistically I think what most surprised me was the difficulty of navigating the healthcare system. It seems like it should be something that works for you when you need it, but often times we’re faced with the challenge of trying to provide quality care within the confines of an insurance plan that makes it difficult for patients and practitioners to access all of the benefits they pay for each month with their premium. It seems crazy to me to have to justify care in certain situations that warrant it and still have hoops to jump through to make it happen.

Are you currently pursuing any further education/certifications?

I’m in the process of reviewing to get my CSCS (Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist) and plan on getting my OCS (Orthopedics Certified Specialist) in the next few years. In the mean time I’m looking to take a course on Functional Range Conditioning to update on some movement systems.

What is the biggest misconception you hear from new patients?

The biggest misconception I get all the time is that PTs just do massage and stretching. Though those can be helpful in their own way and are sometimes incorporated in a treatment plan, physical therapy is much more than that. I wish everyone knew that PTs are movement experts and evaluating how your body moves and can (or cannot) control movement is a unique and challenging aspect for clinicians. I always try to emphasize that the more active a patient is in their treatment the better the outcomes.

What’s your go-to breakfast?

I’m usually trying to get something quick, so I’m a big smoothie guy. My go-to is usually spinach, almond butter, bananas, some sort of berry and almond milk. It’s either that or some Greek yogurt, raspberries and granola. I basically eat the same thing every morning haha.

What is the most important personality trait that a PT must have?

Most importantly, physical therapists have to be compassionate. Truly listening to your patient and finding a way to meet them where they are is crucial. If you don’t value your patient’s goals as your own, it can be tougher to get them there.

What do you do to de-stress/unwind?

I usually try to read. I bounce back and forth between fiction and non-fiction, but it’s easy for me to get caught up in what I’m reading and it helps to take my mind out of its normal space.

Finish this sentence: On Saturday mornings, you can usually find me…

On my way to find an egg-everything bagel and an iced coffee treat.

What is your favorite piece of wellness advice to offer?

The best workout plan is something that’s sustainable. Sometimes we ask our patients to do a lot in the name of rehab, but what we’re trying to instill more often than not is consistency. In order to create lasting change, it needs to be approachable and repeatable.

Click here to learn more about Aaron and the other physical therapists at Therapydia Denver.

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