Lacrosse Ball Trigger Point Exercises

At Therapydia Denver, every patient receives one-on-one hands-on treatments. Our PTs are certified in manual therapy and these techniques allow us to mobilize the joints and muscles as well as release trigger points. Trigger points are areas of adhesions within soft tissue resulting from trauma or overuse and can lead to ineffective movement and pain. In addition to hands-on manual therapy techniques, all our PTs are also certified in dry needling – a great way to release trigger points.

The goal of each physical therapy visit is to restore proper length tension relationships of soft tissue and enhance normal joint mechanics for proper function. Our patients can replicate some of these myofascial release techniques at home with the use of a lacrosse ball applied to trigger points in tissue. We like lacrosse balls because they can get into those hard to reach places foam rollers may miss. Below are a couple of lacrosse ball exercises we recommend for our patients:

pec-trigger-point-massage

PECTOLARIS MINOR

  • Great for posture correction and for patients that sit at a desk or computer all day
  • Picture on left demonstrates a less aggressive pec minor release
  • Picture on right is slightly more aggressive for those stubborn trigger points in the pec muscle
  • Trigger point is typically found an inch or two below the collarbone and just to the inside of the shoulder
  • Be careful not to place ball directly on the front of the shoulder.  This is where the biceps tendon is located and can get irritated from the pressure.  This will typically feel like a sharp pain if you are on the tendon vs an achy sensation on the trigger point.
  • 10-90 second hold, repeat 1-3 times, 1-2 times per day

hip exercise

TENSOR FASCIA LATAE

  • Find boney point in front of hip (ASIS) and move ball 2-3 inches down and to the side
  • Lay on side and apply sustained pressure with ball to the muscle
  • Duration of pressure depends on how long it takes for muscle or trigger point to “release”
  • Release of the trigger point can usually be felt when there is a significant decrease in the intensity of the pain from the pressure of the ball
  • We typically tell patients that the intensity of discomfort should drop several points on the 0-10 pain scale
  • For example, if discomfort is 8/10 on the pain scale, then hold the pressure on the trigger point until the pain drops to at least a 3-4/10
  • This can take anywhere from 10 – 90 seconds

calf tightness exercise

CALF

  • Place one calf on ball and cross opposite leg over the top
  • Locate tender trigger point and hold sustained pressure
  • Gently pump bottom ankle up and down for more aggressive trigger point release
  • Again hold pressure until there is significant change in intensity of symptoms
  • 10-90 second hold, repeat 1-3 times, 1-2 times per day

 

rotator cuff releas

ROTATOR CUFF

  • Locate tender trigger point(s) in back of shoulder, specifically on back of shoulder blade
  • Start with arm externally rotated (picture on left)
  • Maintain pressure on trigger point as you rotate shoulder into internal rotation (picture on right)
  • There are several trigger points in the back of the shoulder/shoulder blade so more than one point may need to be treated to address symptoms
  • These trigger points tend to cause radiating pain into front of shoulder and/or down the arm so don’t be surprised if ache is felt in areas other than where the ball is placed.
  • 10-90 second hold, repeat 1-3 times, 1-2 times per day

lacrosse-ball-plantar-fasciitis-therapy

PLANTAR FASCIITIS

  • Place the lacrosse ball under the arch of your bare foot and begin rolling.
  • Roll the ball in multiple directions
  • You should feel instant relief from tight arches. (Image source: Shape)

INTER-SCAPULAR

  • Place lacrosse ball in between scapula and spin
  • Add movement of the arm into flexion overhead and back down to the hip for several reps, encouraging more upper thoracic extension at end range shoulder flexion.
  • Move lacrosse ball to multiple locations left and right side of spine with short duration holds of pressure

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